The NHS Race – Can You Speak Fast Enough?

Anne Marie Waters 

February 11th 2020 

 

This morning I read the most fascinating string of tweets on the account of Telegraph journalist Allison Pearson (@allisonpearson).  It’s something I haven’t previously been aware of, and reveals to us, yet again, the shocking state of the NHS – it’s even worse than I thought.

The tweets refer to NHS GP services.  People are sending messages to Pearson describing the speed at which their GP appointments must take place, and the apparent ‘rule’ that doctors will now only deal with one ailment at a time.

This isn’t medicine.

I last saw an NHS GP a couple of years ago, and I learned for myself that these services are not patient-centred.  This is all about getting people out the other side as fast as possible.  There is no real discussion, no inquiry as to general well-being, and you will be very lucky indeed to see the same doctor twice.

The tweets shared by Pearson however are genuinely shocking.  These are life and death situations.  For obvious reasons, I can’t vouch for the validity of any of these statements, but if I’m honest, I’d well believe them.

Here are some, beginning with the initial tweet from Pearson herself.

@allisonpearson Two friends in different parts of the country say their GP now limits patients to raising one ailment only. Surely it’s often the second or third “minor” twinge that helps make the diagnosis? This is dangerous.

@wendmyway Diagnosis of ovarian cancer is often involving swollen stomach, tiredness, bladder or bowel frequency, difficulty eating normal quantities, if those were limited to one it explains the nearly 70% death rate from ovarian cancer.

@mummyJo46 It’s been that way at our local surgery for a while. I’ve often thought that surely if they hear all of your ailments it may help them more accurately diagnose

@JeunesseLon We always had that – second ailment book a second appointment – they had to achieve 7 minute per patient target

@remindme2smile Ditto…exhibited symptoms of lymphoma (so we found out) but not spotted by any of the docs at my GP. Took a locum who I saw quite by chance to identify it. I owe him my life. All it took was a simple blood test.

@ChipsEgg  Same in ours. I even had a discussion with the doc that it is more efficient, saves time and admin, to discuss everything in one visit. Not interested. It’s all about getting patients through asap.

@peteharry23  After real horror stories from a number of friends , one of whom has terminal cancer due to late and misdiagnosis, I took out private medical insurance 2 months ago. No party is allowed to reform the NHS as it needs .

The final tweet from @peteharry23 is particularly interesting.  This is a person who has taken out private health insurance to avoid the NHS; the very reason the National Health Service was created was to ensure we didn’t have to pay for healthcare.  Now, people are paying for healthcare because the NHS isn’t working.

I’ll respectfully disagree with final point from pete, it’s not because parties aren’t allowed to reform the NHS, it’s because they simply don’t have the courage.  The NHS is sacred, and if you dare criticise it, left-wingers will go for the jugular.  Our politicians are terrified of left-wingers.

For Britain will keep the NHS, but not in its current form.  It isn’t working, and when it isn’t working, it must be fixed.  Part of the problem is people draining its money straight in to their own pockets. Virgin for example is making millions from the health service, and nothing has improved for patients – quite the opposite.

The top-heavy and completely unnecessary management and consultancy culture has turned the service in to a nice little earner for professional bureaucrats.  Millions are wasted on ‘diversity’ and other nonsensical political correctness that has nothing to do with healthcare.

The NHS can be reformed, of course it can, but it will take a party of genuine courage who will not play the political game, and will put the people first.

That party is here.  A party for the NHS, for health, and For Britain.

 

Anne Marie Waters 

Leader 

For Britain